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The Irishman (2019)

The Irishman

His story changed history 2019/11/1 209 min.
8
Average: 8 (1367 votes)
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Directors

Martin Scorsese
Martin Scorsese

Cast

Robert De Niro is Frank Sheeran
Robert De Niro
Frank Sheeran
Al Pacino is Jimmy Hoffa
Al Pacino
Jimmy Hoffa
Joe Pesci is Russell Bufalino
Joe Pesci
Russell Bufalino
Stephen Graham is Anthony 'Tony Pro' Provenzano
Stephen Graham
Anthony 'Tony Pro' Provenzano
Ray Romano is Bill Bufalino
Ray Romano
Bill Bufalino
Harvey Keitel is Angelo Bruno
Harvey Keitel
Angelo Bruno
Bobby Cannavale is 'Skinny Razor'
Bobby Cannavale
'Skinny Razor'
Anna Paquin is Older Peggy Sheeran
Anna Paquin
Older Peggy Sheeran
Stephanie Kurtzuba is Irene Sheeran
Stephanie Kurtzuba
Irene Sheeran
Kathrine Narducci is Carrie Bufalino
Kathrine Narducci
Carrie Bufalino

Synopsis

One could say that the entire movie The Irishman was made to be enjoyed specifically on the big screen, but an austere and camera story with two characters that happened in one location is not the same as a $150 million budget movie set during the 1950s, 1960s and 1970s with the prodigious narrative, visual, sound and musical dimensions of The Irish. Watch it online to live the full experience for yourself.

Unfortunately, as a result of the extensive battle (without truce signs at the moment) between the exhibitors and Netflix for the "windows" system, only two rooms will exhibit it in CABA and GBA. In the rest of the world the streaming giant rented (and in some cases even bought) historical and gigantic theaters that were filled with tens of miles of avid moviegoers for the 210 magic minutes of Scorsese and his band of friends in the best conditions.

But enough of regrets (each part of the commercial conflict has its arguments and reasons that are understandable and must be respected) and let's go to the film, which is among the best works of a director who has 25 fiction films and a handful of also notable documentaries.

From the script that the quoted Steven Zaillian (Schindler's List, Mission: Impossible) wrote about the bestseller I Heard You Paint Houses that Charles Brandt published in 2004, Scorsese built a film that tunes in with various themes (obsessions) that accompany him since always like the gangster codes, the limits imposed by power, loyalty, friendship over time, family contradictions, guilt and the search for redemption.

Brandt's book, Zaillan's script and Scorsese's story focus on the figure of Frank "The Irishman" Sheeran (De Niro), a World War II veteran and a truck driver since 1947 who became a hit man of the Mafia Philadelphia that for many years was something like the right hand of Jimmy Hoffa (Al Pacino), the despotic leader of the powerful union of the Teamsters (truckers) that disappeared in the mysterious way in 1975. That essential place of Sheeran in this fascinating story of the multimillion-dollar political and negotiated collusion was a novelty, since "The Irishman" does not even appear in the Hoffa biography.

After a long and beautiful initial sequence we discover an old and prostrated Sheeran in an asylum. It will be from that wheelchair and with the unmistakable voiceover of De Niro that will tell us during the next three hours and peak the capturing facts of this saga of crimes, alliances and betrayals, union fights, judicial processes and family disagreements. Watch it now to see how it ends. This "The Godfather" of Scorsese was conceived as a succession of authentic film choreographies in which not only his portentous narrative virtuosity, but also the photography of Rodrigo Prieto, the edition of Thelma Schoonmaker, the art design of Bob Shaw and the dozens of songs of blues, rock, jazz, mambo or the Italian song that go from Fats Domino to Muddy Waters, passing through Jerry Vale, the orchestra of Pérez Prado or Van Morrison with Robbie Robertson (the latter author also of incidental music). And special mention for the visual effects led by the Argentine Pablo Helman that allowed “rejuvenate” the characters to narrate from their youth to their old age.

The Irishman stars a typical history of emergence, apogee and collapse, but without neglecting its many facets, readings and derivations (with notable black humor eruptions). Thus, while in the background we see great milestones in history (from the election and subsequent murder of JFK to the successive conflicts with Cuba), Scorsese never loses focus on the relationship between the Sheeran de De Niro, the Hoffa de Pacino and the Mobster Russell Bufalino, brilliantly embodied by Joe Pesci.

Original title The Irishman
TMDb Rating 8 1367 votes

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